About

Translations: ru My photo

My name is Max Korinets, 37 (to 2016) and I am a World Wide Web fan since my 18. I like clarity, order and straightforward approach. I also tend to automate things and remove human factor. Being a perfectionist, I don't take things seriously until they're perfect (i. e. never) though I endlessly try to make them such.

I was raised in a family of a graphic designer and an economist, attended an art school and got some musical education from my grandfather. As a child I was interested in photography, computers and games.

I currently live in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Contents

Biography

The Internet got me in 1996 while I was attending Moscow Internet Expo. A year later I managed to launch my first homepage at geocities. I got some "excellent" marks at the University by simply providing my professors with requested information (which couldn't be obtained by other means) found through Alta Vista or Yahoo. I worked for some time at the campus internet cafe, where I studied HTML and Flash and also made my first website for money.

Later tried myself in webdesign and frontend but neither was satisfying: it took too much time to come up something decent and frontend (the cross-browser aspect in particular) was rather boring. My backend colleagues, on the other hand, impressed me much -- they had power project-wise and were in huge demand. So, I recalled my Informatics teacher positive characteristics on me and the fact that I have won the second prize in our local programming contest (Turbo Pascal) at high school, and plunged into the backend world.

The first thing I tried was e107 -- a big clumsy CMS that did some job for me. Working with it revealed the value of flexibility, most of the PHP systems were lacking of.

Next was the series of usual PHP stuff a self-educated developer had to face: Joomla, Mambo, ..., etomite. The last one was surprisingly light and flexible and coped with exotic tasks easily. There also was a fork of it, called MODx which had a huge potential and became my tool of choice for years to come. Furthermore I founded the Russian MODx Community and had been leading it for some time.

Eventually the time came when MODx wasn't enough and I started to look for something even more flexible, the frameworks. There was a hype around Ruby On Rails, and I did a couple of test projects on it. Unfortunately I couldn't handle the new language easily so I fled back to PHP to try Symfony and CodeIgniter. While mastering the frameworks I started to see new horizons for myself as a webdev: I felt like I could do anything! An online-shop, a corporate system with intranet, a bank account system (no, of course)! The only thing left was to choose the right framework. The framework that doesn't fail, has active community, is backed by serious people and is kind of enterprise-level. And in PHP that, of course, was Zend Framework, so I invested all of my time in it for the next couple of years.

I did quite a few large projects on ZF: a couple of online-shops, a sports game video catalogue and a model system called Whyte Model. Some time later I realized that I liked Object Oriented Programming very much and PHP was not so object oriented by design. I felt the need to switch to a naturally OO language. I looked at Ruby again for a little bit but finally decided to start learning Python.

Python gave me the real passion for programming. Its rules (functional indentation, PEP8, importing), readabilty-first concept, general matureness, that academic flavour convinced me I made the right choice. I was also impressed by the vast number of areas where Python was employed: desktop apps, web, science, 3D-modeling, etc.

I write in Python nowadays -- this blog works on Pelican and is written in reStructured, a Python documentation language.

I even have a funny cv in Python.

Profile

As a software developer I do:

Interests

Note

I used to use yentsun nickname for a long time. The word does not mean anything at all. There are people in Asia with this family name and that is a coincidence. I guess this nickname came from the Mortal Kombat game, where there was a character called Shang Tsung.